eye diseases

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a condition in which elevated pressure in the eye damages the optic nerve, causing peripheral and then total blindness. It is widely noted as the second-leading cause of blindness in the U.S. Symptoms: There may be no early warning signs, so optometrical exams are crucial. Otherwise, pain, blurred vision and the appearance of coloured rings around lights are leading indicators.

Treatment: Once diagnosed, glaucoma treatments are highly effective. Prescription eyedrops, oral medications, laser treatment or even surgery may be involved. If untreated, glaucoma can cause blindness, and there are no cures. Prevention: Because there may be few symptoms, and vision lost to glaucoma cannot be restored (the condition can only be halted), frequent monitoring for glaucoma is essential. The risk for glaucoma increases dramatically after age 35 and is often hereditary.

Cataracts

Cataracts are a clouding of the eye's crystalline lens that usually develops slowly over time. (In the case of post-traumatic cataracts, however, they can also occur very quickly.) It is the leading cause of poor vision in adults. Symptoms: Dimmed or blurred vision, double vision, halos or glare around lights, colours appearing less brilliant, feeling of a film over the eyes, frequently cleaning eyes, difficulty driving or reading, and frequently changing or cleaning glasses. Treatment: If a cataract grows larger or denser, it can be surgically removed. It's a safe procedure with a near 100 per cent success rate. Following surgery, it's normal to require a change in spectacle correction. Prevention: Wearing UV protection when outdoors is very helpful. There is also some evidence to suggest that a diet high in beta carotene (vitamin A), selenium and vitamins C and E have preventative benefits. Avoiding cigarette smoke, air pollution and alcohol consumption may also help.

Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is a condition in which the macula (the part of the retina responsible for sharp reading vision) fails to function efficiently. It is a common cause of impaired reading or detailed vision—the leading cause of blindness worldwide, in fact. Macular degeneration is generally age-related.

Symptoms: Initial signs include blurred reading vision, a weakening of colour vision, distortion or loss of central vision (e.g., a dark spot in the middle of your field of vision), and distortion in vertical lines.

Treatment: Although there is no cure, laser treatment can be effective in slowing the disease's progression. As usual, early detection is key.

Prevention: Lifelong UV protection is very important. General nutrition is also believed to play a significant preventative role. Zinc may be especially helpful in this regard, particularly for zinc-deficient people like seniors. There is also some evidence to suggest that a diet high in beta carotene (vitamin A) and vitamins C and E can protect the macula. However, an over-abundance of any vitamin may affect your body's ability to absorb important nutrients. This is a matter of some debate among health care professionals.

Dry Eyes

Dry eyes are a problem that arises from inadequate or poor lubrication and moisture in one or both eyes. Unable to produce enough tears, afflicted eyes suffer irritation, burning and general discomfort.

Dry eyes may be caused by a number of factors: the natural effects of aging, side effects from medication, or significant time spent in a dry climate. Although there is no cure as such, your Optometrist is able to offer effective treatment to manage dry eyes. Artificial lubricating eyedrops enhance tear production, and moist compresses as well as lid massages can help treat dry eyes.

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy, as the name suggests, is associated with diabetes . It is best described as damage to the retina that occurs because of defects in or leakage from the fine blood vessels. The vast majority of those with early diabetic retinopathy are unaware of it. In advanced cases, it can result in vision blurriness and distortion.

Diabetics should ensure they see their Optometrist regularly, scheduling annual eye exams. Because it is a progressive disease, without treatment it can cause blindness over time. Your Optometrist can provide the invaluable advice and treatment diabetics require

Spots & Floaters

Spots and floaters are tiny flecks or threads, experienced by most people, that seem to float in front of your eyes. They are often caused by particles of protein trapped in the fluid inside the eye, or by the deterioration of the fluid due to advancing age.

Occasionally they are the result of certain eye diseases or injuries, or they may signal the development of more serious conditions such as retinal detachment. They are usually harmless, but those experiencing a sudden change or increase in "spots and floaters" or flashes of light should consult their eye doctor.

Retinal Detachment

Retinal detachment is the separation of the retina from the pigment epithelium. It is often caused by holes or tears in the retina, by a tumour, or by fluid pressure in the area.

Retinal detachment occurs among the elderly or, sometimes, following head or eye injuries. There is also a higher rate of incidence among the extremely myopic. B.C. MSP coverage for such patients allows for more frequent eye exams.

In some cases it can be surgically treated. Apart from a sudden loss of vision, other (early) symptoms may include light flashes or a unusual number of "spots and floaters."

All content is provided for education and information, and is no substitute for the advice of your optometrist. This information is provided courtesy of the British Columbia Association of Optometrists (B.C.A.O.). The B.C.A.O. assumes no responsibility or liability arising from any errors or omissions or from the use of any information contained herein.